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Tag Archives: RFID

  • Create Your Movie Jukebox With Our RFID + AV KitDecember 14, 2015

    Movie Jukebox

    Smart Cards Kit (NFC/RFID 13.56MHz)

    Smart Cards Kit (NFC/RFID 13.56MHz)
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    A few weeks ago we were telling about how to keep your home safe and watched with our 3G+GPRS Mobile Kit to make a wireless security system. We want to give you more suggestions in order to make an IoT Home, so we are showing this week the Smart Cards Kit (NFC/RFID 13.56MHz) + A/V Kit, that allows to create your own movie jukebox.

    With this kit, your TV will become a smart media center. The idea is to synchronize your favourite films with a RFID 13.56MHz/NFC card, then connect it with the A/V Kit and switch it to you TV. You will enjoy your films just selecting your synchronized cards.

    It is also a great solution for parental control for your kids. ā€¦ Children will not be able to choose films for adults because the system allows parents to choose the titles of selected movies and gives them autonomy to program themselves what to watch.

    This kit includes the RFID 13,56MHz module for Arduino, Raspberry Pi and Intel Galileo, that enables to recognize objects by proximity identification, query the card and sends instructions to it.

    You can find other interesting items in the kit to create your own movie jukebox, as pcDuino AV kit to transform your TV in a media center, a Xbee Shield that allows to use XBee modules, our Bluetooth Pro or RFID, or five RFID 13.56MHz/NFC cards to enable the wireless communication.

    You can see in the next video an simple example of the use of a NFC/RFID smart card:

  • RFID / NFC - Weekly RecapAugust 14, 2015

    RFID stands for radio frequency identification. This technology makes use of electromagnetic fields to identify objects in a contactless way. It is widely used in access cards and public transport cards.

    Here you can find some examples of what you can achieve with RFID and Arduino.

    NFC Door Lock

    This is a very common application for NFC. With a card, a reader and some additional components you can make your own contactless door lock. This door lock is controlled by a Qduino Mini, because it fits perfectly, but any Arduino compatible board will do the job.

    Qtechknow used a servo to drive the locking bolt, and several 3d-printed parts to make a housing and mount everything on the door. So the NFC shield, the board and a LiPo battery are placed inside this casing on the door lock.

    NFC_door_lock

    Now you just have to put your card close enough to the reader, and when the NFC tag is detected the board activates the servo and it unlocks the door.

    See more pics and download the code for this project on Instructables. Via Adafruit.

    RFID Lamp

    arduino_lamp

    Here's a completely different project, nothing to do with security or access control. Philippe made his own interactive RGB/RFID lamp from scratch.

    By placing different colored tags close to the hidden reader you can change the color, a black disc is used to turn off the lamp and a white disc to make a white light. The lamp changes color randomly when it doesn't detect any tag.

    The lamp is controlled by an Arduino Uno board and all the different colors are made by a strip of RGB LEDs, driven by the PWM pins of the Arduino. The pins are connected through Mosfet transistors, and controlling the voltage in each channel you can change the color.

    The RFID reader is connected to digital pins 8 & 9, and the system is powered by a 12V wall transformer. A small LED, connected on digital pin 7, indicates when the RFID reader is ready to read, and a piezo speaker on pin 10 is used to add sound to the lamp.

    He designed with frizting a custom shield integrating all the electronics for the lamp. The shield is a single side PCB and is mounted on top of the Arduino.

    The housing of the lamp was designed with SketchUp and made out of plywood and pine pieces, and the LED strip is wrapped around a PCV pipe.

    The Arduino with the shield are attached at the bottom of the wood box and the RFID reader is placed under the disc holder.

    The color discs are also made out of plywood, each one containing a different RFID tag.

    Posted on Instructables. Visit Philippe's blog to see more projects like this one: basbrun.com.

    Take a look at our own LED Lamp controlled with RFID tags here.

    RFID Car Starter

    This is a pretty cool hack of a car starter system. Pierre wanted to customize his new car and added this incredible feature to start the engine with an RFID tag.

    He placed a 13.56 MHz RIFD reader on the dashboard, so the tag has to be held for over a second and the car starts. Then to turn it off he just have to hold it again for a second.

    An Arduino Nano receives the info from the reader and controls a relay module with two relays that start or shut down the engine. All the components are cleverly hidden under the armrest and on the dashboard so it is amazing to see it working. Check it out in the video above.

    Posted on Hackaday.

    Don't forget to take a look at our own RFID/NFC kits and modules for Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Waspmote and Intel Galileo. Click here.

  • Arduino LED Lamp Controlled with RFID TagsApril 15, 2015

    RGB LED Lamp

    This is another project made by the Cooking Hacks Team. To develop this project we reused an old desk lamp. They are useful and everybody needs one but, to be honest, they can be a little boring.

    So we thought of somehow making it a bit more entertaining and we added several colors and a contactless way of choosing between them.

    It is a RGB LED Lamp controlled with RFID tags. Making use of several cards (or tags) you can choose the color of the lamp: red, blue, green, white or random.

    This time, the mind behind the project is Marcos, from the R&D department in Cooking Hacks.

    But, what is RFID? RFID stands for Radio Frequency Identification. This term includes technologies that use electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects.

    An RFID system consists of a reader (transceiver) and a tag (transponder). The tag usually contains a chip and an antenna: the info to identify a person or an object is stored in the chip and the antenna allows the chip to transfer the identification data to a reader.

    The reader creates an electromagnetic field through its antenna, and when the tag is placed close enough to receive the signal it responds by sending back the info stored in its chip. Then the reader is able to process the information sent by the tag and transmit it to a computer program.

    Recycling the old lamp

    First thing we did was to look at what we had in our hands. We opened the lamp to see if we could use anything but, since we are building everything around an Arduino Uno and LED strips, there wasn't really much we could take advantage of.

    RGB LED Strip

    We ended up getting rid of all the electronics inside and we just made use of the lamp casing. In order to make all the different colors we are using RGB LED strips so we had to remove the bulb too.

    So what's inside?

    What's Inside?

    The lighting is made with an RGB LED strip. This kind of LEDs actually have three different LED packed inside, one red, one green and one blue. By mixing up the light and brightness of each one of them you can obtain any color you want. For example, to make a white light we have to turn on all three LEDs with the same intensity, and, if we turn off the blue LED, mixing just red and green, we would have a yellow light.

    As we said before, we replaced the bulb with a couple of LED strips that are glued to the lamp and connected through the lamp's arm to the Arduino board. The LED strip have for pins: one for each color (red, green and blue) and one for power (12V). The blue, red and green cables are plugged into the pins number 9, 10 and 11 of the Arduino, and the power pin is plugged into the Vin.

    We removed the power cable too, and instead we used a 12V AC Adapter. This voltage is needed for the LED Stripes, and is available on the Vin pin.

    The wireless identification is made with our RFID 13.56 MHz Module (XBee Socket). This module allows to read and write different cards. The reader antenna is glued to the casing, under the lamp's base, so it can easily read the tags. It has an Xbee Socket, that means it can't be plugged directly to the Arduino Board.

    RGB LED Lamp

    To do so the module is connected to a Communication Shield. This shield allows to use XBee or our Bluetooth and RFID modules. The Communication shield is then attached to the Arduino board.

    Five 13.56 MHz cards are used to choose the color of the lamp. You can re-write this cards to change the stored information, so we assigned to each card a unique identification. That way, whenever you place one over the reader, the card automatically sends the data stored in its chip and the reader transmits the info to the Arduino Board. Depending on which card we are using it lights up a different color. One card is used to choose a random and changing color. It keeps that color until it detects another valid card.

    You can see the LED Lamp working on this video:

    Give it a go

    This project was developed following our RFID 13.56 MHz Tutorial. We are glad to share the code with you:

    if (state == 0)              // if so, we can be sure that we read correctly one UID
       {
          // search if the read card is inside the data base
          card = search(vCards, _UID, nCards); 
                                
         if (card != -1) {                    // if so, this is one of OUR cards
           Serial.print("\r\n  Card number ");
           Serial.print(card);
           Serial.print(" identified. Access granted.");
           hits[card]++;                      // add one more hit for the read card
    
           if (card == 0){
            Serial.println("Rojo");
            digitalWrite(9,HIGH);             //azul
            digitalWrite(10,LOW);             //rojo
            digitalWrite(11,HIGH);            //verde
      
           }
    ...
    

    You can download the complete code here.

    Check more CH Team Hacks, for instance this Resistor Cutting Robot.

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