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Tag Archives: IR

  • Remotely Control Your HVAC System with Our IR Remote ModuleNovember 5, 2015

    hvac_tv_infrared_control_kit_info

    HVAC IR Remote module for Arduino / Raspberry Pi

    ir_remote_shield

    Buy now

    Winter is almost here, and we thought we could give you a hand to keep your house warm and save energy, just by controlling any home device with infrared commands. This is why we are featuring the HVAC Remote module for Arduino and Raspberry Pi.

    This small shield is capable of recording any infrared command sent by a remote control from any of your home appliances, like your TV or HVAC components (heating, ventilating and air conditioning). It is easily plugged on top of your Arduino board, or Raspberry Pi with our Connection Bridge. Then, with any of the available wireless interfaces (WiFi, GPRS, 3G, Bluetooth and ZigBee/802.15.4) you can simply control your HVAC system from a web server, a laptop or even from your smartphone.

    Save money buying this module in the HVAC & TV Infrared Control Kit.

    Watch the video below to see how it works and don't forget to take a look a the complete IR Remote Tutorial to control your infrared devices.

  • Weekly Recap - PIR SensorsJuly 3, 2015

    A couple of weeks ago we were talking about Infrared projects with Arduino. Today we bring you some IR related hacks, this time with PIR Motion Sensors: a couple of security applications and an energy-saving project.

    Motion Sensing Water Gun

    Now this is not the usual home security system. Ashish made a motion detector that sprays water on the intruder, and after that, to embarrass him/her a little bit more it takes a picture and uploads it to twitter.

    First thing he needed was a motorized water gun. He opened it and soldered two long pieces of wire. It has a motorized pump and he's using a MOSFET to drive it. A Lightblue Bean, an Arduino-compatible microcontroller board that is wirelessly programmed over Bluetooth Low Energy, controls the water gun and reads the signal from a PIR motion sensor.

    BLE_water_gun

    When the PIR sensor detects an intruder it sends a signal to the Bean, then the Bean switches on the MOSFET to turn on the water gun. The Bean is connected via Bluetooth with a computer, then with Node-RED it monitors the Bean serial and, if the PIR sends the signal, a Python script takes a picture and a second script uploads the photo to the twitter account.

    Don't forget to check their Twitter account.

    Posted on Instructables, via Hackaday.

    Raspberry Pi Motion Sensitive Camera

    RPi_Camera2

    This is another security camera project, but this time is built around a Raspberry Pi. Bruce made this camera to keep track of what his cats are up to when he's not home. To do so, he used, apart from the Raspberry Pi, a Raspberry camera module, a PIR motion sensor and a USB WiFi adapter, and he made a wooden case himself with a laser cutter.

    When the Raspberry Pi is switched on it runs a Python program that checks the PIR sensor signal to detect motion.

    If the PIR detects something moving the camera takes a photo or records a short video, then it is uploaded to a DropBox account, so the user can see it in any device.

    Another Python program monitors a shutdown switch on the camera and controls an LED that indicates when the camera is running.

    Also, it blinks and stops the software when the switch is pressed and after that the LED turns off to indicate you can unplug the camera. The camera is mounted on a tripod and powered with a USB AC adapter.

    Check the complete project on Instructables.

    PIR Motion Sensor Lighting

    After all this security projects, here's one that might be helpful to save energy. Steve used an Arduino and a PIR sensor to detect motion. The idea is that the lights turn on automatically when you walk into a room, and when you leave they turn off after a little while.

    Apart from the PIR sensor, he used a solid state relay. This SSR is needed to control the power of the lighting appliance and isolate the AC load from the Arduino.

    9212_pir_sensor

    He also included a manual switch to override the PIR sensor. A SPTD switch is connected to 5V, and to the Arduino pins 11 and 12 so it can manually turn on and off the light.

    The program is continuously reading the PIR sensor and, depending on the SPTD switch, it turns on or off the lights. This is a clever yet simple way to hack a home appliance that makes use of some common and cheap components.

    Check the complete project on Instructables.

    Visit Steve's blog: Arduinotronics.

  • Infrared Hacks - Weekly Recap June 19, 2015

    Infrared Remote Control Tester

    Surely you had this problem. You tried to change the channel on your TV and nothing happened, but you are not sure if it's the batteries or the remote. Rui built a circuit for testing infrared remote controls.

    The circuit is pretty simple but it can turn out to be really useful. To record the IR commands he included a Vishay V34836 IR receiver. He made the PCB with a CNC machine and used a 12F683 microcontroller from Microchip.

    The circuit is powered by a couple of AAA batteries and is glued to the battery holder. As you can see in the video above, a red LED lights up when the circuit is switched on and not receiving any IR signal. If it's receiving continuous data the green LED indicates that the remote is fine, and the yellow LED will indicate that the data stream is broken, so the remote is not working properly.

    Take a look at our own IR Remote Module.

    Check this helpful project here. Via Hackaday.

    Infrared Tachometer using Arduino

    This project is again simple but very resourceful. [Pinodisco] made a tachometer out of some basic components: a couple of resistors, a motor and wheel assembly and an infrared LED and Phototransistor.

    He placed the IR LED and Phototransistor (receiver) facing each other and close, so the receiver can read the signal through the window in the wheel.

    tachometer

    He is using an Arduino Due to read the signal from the Phototransistor: the IR receiver is connected to the analog pin A0 in the board, and the IR LED is connected to 5V through a limiting resistor.

    Then the code counts the time between two signals from the receiver, it converts the value to rps/rpm and prints it in the Arduino IDE serial monitor.

    Read more on Instructables.

    Infrared Pulse Sensor

    Obviously, this isn't a medical device, but it's pretty amazing. Just like in the projects above it is built around an infrared emitter and detector which are placed close to each other.

    This time they are used to detect your pulse. As they explain, when the heart pumps, blood pressure rises and the amount of IR light that gets reflected back to the receiver increases when you press your fingertip against the sensor. So with an amplifier circuitry they can output a signal to the Arduino board.

    The signal is taken to the analog pin A0 and then the data can be viewed through the Arduino serial monitor. Finally they even prepared a sketch so you can visualize the data on your computer with Processing.

    Check our own medical platform: e-Health Sensor Platform.

    Find out more about this step by step tutorial on MAKE

  • International Space Apps ChallengeApril 20, 2015

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    The Space Apps Challenge is an international event coordinated by NASA. A 48 hour long hackathon, it is focused on space exploration and international collaboration to produce open-source solutions to address global needs applicable to both life on Earth and life in space.

    On April 11&12 teams of tech enthusiasts competed and collaborated to contribute with innovative alternatives to a list of 25 global challenges in four areas: Earth, Outer Space, Humans and Life in Space, making use of open data supplied by NASA missions. These challenges range from designing your own asteroid mission to mapping of drinking water resources.

    133 cities around the world joined this event that encourages to cooperate and work together, and nearly a thousand projects were presented. Local hosts judge the project at each location based on creativity, impact, sustainability, presentation and product solution. Up to two of them can be nominated and advance to a global judging round. Besides, each event can pick one People's Choice nomination so everybody can vote for their favorites via social media among the top 25. See the global nominations here.

    In this global round, it's time for NASA to select five winners in each of the five finalist categories: Best Mission Concept, Best Use of Hardware, Best Use of Data, Most Inspiring and Galactic Impact. Finalists must upload to a public repository any code developed for the app and have to prepare a short description and record a one minute video about the project.

    Space Apps Zaragoza

    Zaragoza held one of the many events that took place over Europe. Libelium and Cooking Hacks sponsored this Space Apps Challenge, and contributed by providing five Arduino Uno that were handed over to the winners.

    It was the second edition of Space Apps Zaragoza. Last year was really successful, with over 80 participants, and even one of the teams, OpenCuriosity, made it to the international final (read about it here). The place was filled with students, young professionals and techies.

    Space Apps Zaragoza

    The day started with a talk on cosmic radiation followed by a presentation of ideas and teams. Then it was time for every team to work on their apps. Another talk on the Space Race on the evening and after that, everybody kept working until late at night. On the second day, all the teams hurried to finish their projects and present them to the jury.

    A total of eight teams presented their projects, which were focused on various themes: water management, wearables, forest mapping... Here you have the two picks for the international round and the people's choice app: Eye of Horus, Cropper and WaterImprove.

    Eye of Horus

    The first project to be nominated was Eye of Horus, an app developed by Makeroni team that meets the challenge of Space Wearables: to design wearable clothing that could help engineers, technicians on earth and researchers and astronauts in space.

    It is a open source platform that enables the user to interact with objects via eye-tracking. It includes a wireless system that evaluates eye pupil images under infrared illumination, and a frontal camera that lets the system know where you are looking at.

    The prototype is powered by a lithium battery that supplies 5V through a DC/DC converter. It includes a VoCore, a coin-sized Linux computer with WiFi that runs OpenWrt, a small USB endoscope camera and IR leds to illuminate the eyes. The pupil absorb IR light, resulting in a dark spot in the images recorded by the camera. A bandpass filter was attached to the camera to block the non-infrared frequencies of light.

    As a complement for this prototype, a Light beacon (Infrared Flashlight) device was designed so the system can communicate with other devices. When the eye tracking system detects that you are looking at the IR light from the beacon the computer sends a turn on/off request. The beacon receives this request through a bluetooth low energy module (BLE) and, in this case, turns on and off a lamp with a relay control module. They also 3D printed the casing for the system.

    Luis MartĂ­n, from Cooking Hacks, and JosĂŠ Luis Berrocal, from Libelium's IT Department, are part of this team. We are proud of you guys!

    Find out all about Eye of Horus here.

    Cropper

    Cropper

    The second nominee was Cropper, an app developed by five students of the University of Zaragoza to solve the Crop Alert Challenge: a mobile/web app that provides crowd-sourced data so it helps growers to deal with pests and diseases in their crops.

    In their own words it is a real-time collaborative social-network made for farmers who want to alert to other farmers of dangerous events, like floods, storms, plagues, diseases, etc. Users are able to add an event or report diseases in their crops so the data is represented on a world map. You can subscribe to a specific area in order to receive an alert with any incident related to it.

    Follow Cropper's development on their blog and Twitter account.

    People's Choice: WaterImprove

    This team, which includes an economist and a geologist, attemps to solve the Clean Water Mapping Challenge. They made an app that represents drinking water quality anywhere in the world so you can visualize data on a map in real time. Read about their project here.

    The results of the global judging process will be announced in May, we will keep you posted on it.

  • A new update on e-Wheelchair project using e-Health Sensor PlatformMarch 25, 2015

    The e-Wheelchair project

    For almost a year now we have been following and supporting the e-Wheelchair project by Philip Case. You will certainly remember this amazing project in which Phil, aka “The Captain”, is developing a mind-controlled wheelchair using Neurosky products, Vuzix smart glasses, Mindwave Mobile and the Mindflex EEG and implementing Cooking Hacks e-Health Sensor Platform for body monitoring (e-Wheelchair project part1 – part2).

    What's new?

    The e-Wheelchair has a logo: Phil and his wife have designed a logo and a slogan. It's inspired by the glasses and the mind controlling the wheelchair. The slogan reads: “Power on your mind, move to freedom... ”. Hopefully it will help to bring the project to light and to stand out now that he's starting to promote it.

    Power on your mind, move to freedom...
    Power on your mind, move to freedom...

    Phil wearing his glasses

    Ups & Downs and Go Fund Me campaign

    Sarah Bennett, who is helping Phil and writing about him on her blog Tech and Toast, started a Go Fund Me page in order to collect everything necessary for the e-Wheelchair. Phil uses a Panasonic Toughbook because of its rugged design and shock protection but unfortunately somebody stole it while he was undergoing surgery. This Toughbook is essential for him since he only has use of one hand. Another drawback on this courageous journey was that last month Phil fell while getting into the chair. He hurt his back and has to have surgery again.

    But it's not all bad news, of course. Last thing we know is that the laptop has been funded by Vuzix, a technology firm that's supporting Phil, and the project keeps moving forward. He is using the Vuzix M100 smart glasses that he won in a competition. These glasses are controlled by voice and gesture and give you the functionality of a smartphone so it's very helpful to enhance the user experience. They also support native Android Apps so the e-Health Sensor Platform application is displayed on the glasses for real time view.

    More good news: Phil has now a Prusa i3 printer. A 3D printer is important because he can make himself the housings for the wheelchair and any customized parts he needs instead of having to buy them all.

    Another improvement to the wheelchair is the add-on kit. Now the project becomes portable and that way more affordable for people that don't want to buy a new wheelchair or don't have the funds.

    The e-Health Sensor Platform Expansion Box

    Complete eWheelchair and sensors

    As we said before, the e-Wheelchair includes the e-Health Sensor Shield to monitor vital signs such as Airflow, Galvanic Skin Response or ECG.

    Phil has designed and built an Expansion Box for the e-Health Platform. It's in a special built housing, covered in liquid rubber and waterproof. He included a display to visualize the data. The shield is powered by renewable energy through solar panels and a pair of dynamos.

    He also incorporated an additional part so that only the user or medical professionals can view it, since data protection is now a priority.

    The e-Health Sensor Platform has been extended in lengths so that patients can move from the e-Wheelchair to their bed and still be connected for monitoring Body Position, Airflow (Sleep Apnea), ECG, Body Temperature, SPO2 and Blood Pressure.

    The next stage Phil is looking into is to make the Blood Glucose system wireless. He is going to use a CGM device (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) with transmitter and receiver connected to the e-Health Platform in order to display the data on the Expansion Box, the M100 SmartGlasses and sent it to the cloud for either a doctor o carer to have access to. All of this focusing on protecting people's personal and confidential details.

    After these intense months Phil keeps working hard and carries on with his project. What started as a small plan is getting bigger and bigger. Now he's looking at exhibiting it as much as possible.

    We will be following up Phil's work and keep you posted about the e-Wheelchair progress.

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