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  • Differences between the old e-Health Platform and MySignalsOctober 4, 2016

    Differences between the old e-Health Platform and MySignals


    Discover MySignals now!


    MySignals is the new generation of eHealth and medical development products specifically oriented to researchers, developers and makers. It has new features that significantly improve the previous version commonly known as eHealth v2.

    • The number of sensors has been increased from 10 to 16.
    • The new sensors availables are: Snore, Spirometer, Blood Pressure (BLE), SPO2 (BLE), Glucometer (BLE) and Body Scale (weight, bone mass, body fat, muscle mass, body water, visceral fat, Basal Metabolic Rate and Body Mass Index)
    • The accuracy of the sensors has been improved.
    • The sensor probes are more robust now.
    • The new generation integrates a faster MCU with 4 times more memory.
    • WiFi and BLE radios now integrated on the PCB.
    • A complete graphic system with a TFT touchscreen allows to see the data coming realtime from the sensors.
    • New 'audio type' jack connectors allows it to be used by non technical staff.
    • CE / FCC / IC certifications passed for MySignals SW.
    • Cloud Storage of the data is now available to save historical information.
    • Native Android / iOS App's can be used now to visualize the information in realtime and to browse the Cloud data.


    Discover MySignals, the new eHealth and medical development platform!

    In the next tables you can see a complete comparative between eHealth v2 and the two different models of MySignals.

    GENERAL FEATURES

    There are several differences comparing the general features of MySignals and the previous product version eHealth V2.

    e-Health V2.0
    MySignals SW
    MySignals HW
    Architecture
    Arduino compatible
    Libelium IoT Core
    Arduino compatible
    RAM Memory
    2K
    8K
    2K
    Microprocessor
    Atmega 328 (Arduino UNO)
    Atmega 2560
    Atmega 328 (Arduino UNO)
    Flash Memory
    32K
    256K
    32K
    UART sockets
    1
    1
    1 (multiplexed)
    Enclosure
    Complete Kit
    SDK
    Screen
    GLCD - optional (basic graphics)
    TFT (complete graphic interface)
    TFT (basic graphics)
    TouchScreen
    Cloud Storage
    Android / iOS App
    API Cloud
    API Android/iOS
    Sensors
    10
    16
    16
    Wired Sensors
    10
    11
    11
    Wireless Sensors
    10
    16
    16
    Concurrent Sensor Readings
    From any sensor (10) to one interface
    From any sensor (16) to one interface (TFT, BLE, WiFi)
    From one group of sensors (analog, UART, BLE) to one interface (TFT, BLE, WiFi)
    Radios on board
    -
    BLE, WiFi
    BLE, WiFi
    Extra Radios
    BT, ZigBee, 4G / 3G / GPRS
    -
    BT, ZigBee, 4G / 3G / GPRS
    Certifications
    -
    CE / FCC / IC
    -

    SENSORS

    eHealth V2.0
    MySignals SW
    MySignals HW
    Body Position
    Body temperature
    Electromyography
    Electrocardiography
    Airflow
    Galvanic Skin Response
    Blood Pressure
    Pulsioximeter
    Glucometer
    Spirometer
    Snore
    Scale (BLE)
    Blood Pressure (BLE)
    Pulsioximeter (BLE)
    Glucometer (BLE)
    Electroencephalography
    e-Health Sensor Platform last units
    MySignals SW - eHealth and Medical IoT Development Platform
    MySignals HW - eHealth and Medical IoT Development Platform for Arduino
    MySignals - eHealth and Medical IoT Development Platform

  • Indoor Tracking using 4G and A-GPS mode with Arduino and Raspberry Pi (Geo-Location)September 6, 2016

    Indoor Location using 4G and A-GPS mode with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Most of the major cities are already turning their cellular networks to the new 4G LTE and at the same time shutting down the old technologies such as GPRS and GSM. 3G will survive a couple of years more but it is planned to be completely shut off too. For this reason in Cooking Hacks we have decided to be the first to offer to the Maker community the possibility of using the amazing 4G cellular networks.

    The new 4G shield for Arduino and Raspberry Pi enables the connectivity to high speed LTE, HSPA+, WCDMA cellular networks in order to make possible the creation of the next level of worldwide interactivity projects inside the new "Internet of Things" era.

    Besides, the GPS / Glonass module can make possible to perform geolocation services using NMEA sentences offering information such as latitude, longitude, altitude and speed what makes it perfect to perform tracking applications.

    One of the positioning techniques to provide the localization to end devices that enables this module is A-GPS or AGPS, which is based on the help of a cellular network deploying an A-GPS server.

    Assisted GPS enhances the performance of standard GPS in devices connected to the cellular network. A-GPS mode is a feature that allows the GPS receiver, installed on the module, to perform its First Fix using assistance data provided by entities deployed by Cellular Network. It improves the location performance of cell phones (and other connected devices) in two ways:

    • By helping obtain a faster "time to first fix" (TTFF). A-GPS acquires and stores information about the location of satellites via the cellular network so the information does not need to be downloaded via satellite.
    • By helping position a phone or mobile device when GPS signals are weak or not available such as indoor locations. GPS satellite signals may be impeded by tall buildings, and do not penetrate building interiors well. A-GPS uses proximity to cellular towers to calculate position when GPS signals are not available..

    The location given by the A-GPS module may vary depending on the spot used to perform the test. The accuracy will improve when the device is situated in a high density or poor cellular antennas area. The detection accuracy may vary from 10 to 100 meters so a real test in each case is mandatory before implementing a final application.

    If your are interested in developing projects which include 4G LTE communication, find all the info you need in the 4G + GPS Shield for Arduino and Raspberry Pi Tutorial (LTE / WCDMA / HSPA+ / 3G / GPRS) tutorial and if your are interested in A-GPS location in particular visit Indoor Tracking using 4G and A-GPS mode with Arduino and Raspberry Pi (Geo-Location).

    Know all the 4G + GPS Shield available with Arduino and Raspberry Pi in Cooking Hacks store:

    In this section, the execution of the A-GPS in MS-Based mode is shown. For this purpose, the corresponding example was used:

    Arduino:

    Code:
    /*
        --------------- 4G_18 - A-GPS (MS-Based GPS)  ---------------
    
        Explanation: This example shows how to use de A-GPS in MS-Based mode
    
        Note 1: in Arduino UNO the same UART is used for user debug interface 
        and LE910 AT commands. Handle with care, user interface messages could 
        interfere with AT commands.
    
        Example: 
              Serial.print("operATo"); 
        It is seen as wrong AT command by the LE910 module.
    
        Note 2: to run this example properly you must increase the reception 
        serial buffer to 128 bytes. 
        -> go to: <arduino_dir>/hardware/arduino/avr/cores/arduino
        -> edit:  HardwareSerial.h 
    
         If you are using Arduino Uno:
        -> merge: #define SERIAL_RX_BUFFER_SIZE 128
    
         If you are using Arduino Mega:
        -> merge: #define SERIAL_TX_BUFFER_SIZE 128
        -> merge: #define SERIAL_RX_BUFFER_SIZE 128
    
        Copyright (C) 2016 Libelium Comunicaciones Distribuidas S.L.
        http://www.libelium.com
    
        This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
        it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
        the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
        (at your option) any later version.
    
        This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
        but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
        MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
        GNU General Public License for more details.
    
        You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
        along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
    
        Version:           1.1
        Design:            David Gascon
        Implementation:    Alejandro Gallego, Yuri Carmona, Luis Miguel Marti
        Port to Arduino:   Ruben Martin
    */
    
    #include "arduino4G.h"
    
    // APN settings
    ///////////////////////////////////////
    char apn[] = "";
    char login[] = "";
    char password[] = "";
    ///////////////////////////////////////
    
    // define variables
    uint8_t error;
    uint8_t gps_status;
    float gps_latitude;
    float gps_longitude;
    uint32_t previous;
    bool gps_autonomous_needed = true;
    
    
    void setup()
    {
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Set operator parameters
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      _4G.set_APN(apn, login, password);
    
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Show APN settings via Serial port
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      _4G.show_APN();
    
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // 1. Switch on the 4G module
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      error = _4G.ON();
    
      // check answer
      if (error == 0)
      {
        Serial.println(F("1. 4G module ready..."));
    
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
        // 2. Start GPS feature
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
    
        // get current time
        previous = millis();
    
        gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduino4G::GPS_MS_BASED);
    
        // check answer
        if (gps_status == 0)
        {
          Serial.print(F("2. GPS started in MS-BASED. Time(secs) = "));
          Serial.println((millis()-previous)/1000);
        }
        else
        {
          Serial.print(F("2. Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: "));
          Serial.println(gps_status, DEC);
        }
      }
      else
      {
        // Problem with the communication with the 4G module
        Serial.println(F("1. 4G module not started"));
        Serial.print(F("Error code: "));
        Serial.println(error, DEC);
        Serial.println(F("The code stops here."));
        while (1);
      }
    }
    
    
    void loop()
    {
      ////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Wait for satellite signals and get values
      ////////////////////////////////////////////////
      if (gps_status == 0)
      {
        error = _4G.waitForSignal(20000);
    
        if (error == 0)
        {
          Serial.print(F("3. GPS signal received. Time(secs) = "));
          Serial.println((millis()-previous)/1000);
    
          Serial.println(F("Acquired position:"));
          Serial.println(F("----------------------------"));
          Serial.print(F("Ltitude: "));
          Serial.print(_4G._latitude);
          Serial.print(F(","));
          Serial.println(_4G._latitudeNS);
          Serial.print(F("Longitude: "));
          Serial.print(_4G._longitude);
          Serial.print(F(","));
          Serial.println(_4G._longitudeEW);
          Serial.print(F("UTC_time: "));
          Serial.println(_4G._time);
          Serial.print(F("UTC_dte: "));
          Serial.println(_4G._date);
          Serial.print(F("Number of stellites: "));
          Serial.println(_4G._numSatellites, DEC);
          Serial.print(F("HDOP: "));
          Serial.println(_4G._hdop);
          Serial.println(F("----------------------------"));
    
          // get degrees
          gps_latitude  = _4G.convert2Degrees(_4G._latitude, _4G._latitudeNS);
          gps_longitude = _4G.convert2Degrees(_4G._longitude, _4G._longitudeEW);
    
          Serial.println("Conversion to degrees:");
          Serial.print(F("Ltitude: "));
          Serial.println(gps_latitude, 6);
          Serial.print(F("Longitude: "));
          Serial.println(gps_longitude, 6);
          Serial.println();
    
    
          ////////////////////////////////////////////////
          // Change to AUTONOMOUS mode if needed
          ////////////////////////////////////////////////
    
          if (gps_autonomous_needed == true)
          {
            _4G.gpsStop();
    
            gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduino4G::GPS_AUTONOMOUS);
    
            // check answer
            if (gps_status == 0)
            {
              Serial.println(F("GPS started in AUTONOMOUS mode"));
    
              // update variable
              gps_autonomous_needed = false;
            }
            else
            {
              Serial.print(F("Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: "));
              Serial.println(gps_status, DEC);
            }
          }
          delay(10000);
        }
        else
        {
          Serial.print("no stellites fixed. Error: ");
          Serial.println(error, DEC);
        }
      }
      else
      {
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
        // Restart GPS feature
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
    
        Serial.println(F("Restarting the GPS engine"));
    
        // stop GPS
        _4G.gpsStop();
        delay(1000);
    
        // start GPS
        gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduino4G::GPS_MS_BASED);
    
        // check answer
        if (gps_status == 0)
        {
          Serial.print(F("GPS started in MS-BASED. Time(ms) = "));
          Serial.println(millis() - previous);
        }
        else
        {
          Serial.print(F("Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: "));
          Serial.println(gps_status, DEC);
        }
      }
    }
            

    Raspberry Pi:

    Code:
    /*
     *  --------------- 4G_18 - A-GPS (MS-Based GPS)  ---------------
     *
     *  Explanation: This example shows how to use de A-GPS in MS-Based mode
     *
     *  Copyright (C) 2016 Libelium Comunicaciones Distribuidas S.L.
     *  http://www.libelium.com
     *
     *  This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
     *  it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
     *  the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
     *  (at your option) any later version.
     *
     *  This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
     *  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
     *  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
     *  GNU General Public License for more details.
     *
     *  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
     *  along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
     *
     *  Version:           1.1
     *  Design:            David GascĆ³n
     *  Implementation:    Alejandro GƔllego, Yuri Carmona, Luis Miguel Marti
     *  Port to Raspberry: Ruben Martin
     */
    
    #include "arduPi4G.h"
    
    // APN settings
    ///////////////////////////////////////
    char apn[] = "m2m.tele2.com";
    char login[] = "";
    char password[] = "";
    ///////////////////////////////////////
    
    // define variables
    uint8_t error;
    uint8_t gps_status;
    float gps_latitude;
    float gps_longitude;
    uint32_t previous;
    bool gps_autonomous_needed = true;
    
    
    void setup()
    {
      printf("Start program\n");
    
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Set operator parameters
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      _4G.set_APN(apn, login, password);
    
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Show APN settings via USB port
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      _4G.show_APN();
    
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // 1. Switch on the 4G module
      //////////////////////////////////////////////////
      error = _4G.ON();
    
      // check answer
      if (error == 0)
      {
        printf("1. 4G module ready...\n");
    
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
        // 2. Start GPS feature
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
    
        // get current time
        previous = millis();
    
        gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduPi4G::GPS_MS_BASED);
    
        // check answer
        if (gps_status == 0)
        {
          printf("2. GPS started in MS-BASED. Time(secs) = %d\n", (millis()-previous)/1000);
        }
        else
        {
          printf("2. Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: %d\n", gps_status);
        }
      }
      else
      {
    
        // Problem with the communication with the 4G module
        printf("1. 4G module not started\n");
        printf("Error code: %d\n", error);
        printf("The code stops here.\n");
        while (1);
      }
    }
    
    
    void loop()
    {
    
      ////////////////////////////////////////////////
      // Wait for satellite signals and get values
      ////////////////////////////////////////////////
      if (gps_status == 0)
      {
        error = _4G.waitForSignal(20000);
    
        if (error == 0)
        {
          printf("3. GPS signal received. Time(secs) = %d\n", (millis()-previous)/1000);
    
          printf("Acquired position:\n");
          printf("----------------------------\n");
          printf("Latitude: %s, LatitudeNS: %c, Longitude: %s, LongitudeEW: %c, "\
                 "UTC_time:%s, date:%s, Number of satellites: %u, HDOP: %f\n",
                  _4G._latitude, 
                  _4G._latitudeNS, 
                  _4G._longitude, 
                  _4G._longitudeEW, 
                  _4G._time, 
                  _4G._date, 
                  _4G._numSatellites, 
                  _4G._hdop);
          printf("----------------------------\n");
    
          // get degrees
          gps_latitude  = _4G.convert2Degrees(_4G._latitude, _4G._latitudeNS);
          gps_longitude = _4G.convert2Degrees(_4G._longitude, _4G._longitudeEW);
          
          printf("Conversion to degrees:\n");
          printf("Latitude: %f\n", gps_latitude);
          printf("Longitude: %f\n\n", gps_longitude);
    
          ////////////////////////////////////////////////
          // Change to AUTONOMOUS mode if needed
          ////////////////////////////////////////////////
          if (gps_autonomous_needed == true)
          {
            _4G.gpsStop();
    
            gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduPi4G::GPS_AUTONOMOUS);
    
            // check answer
            if (gps_status == 0)
            {
              printf("GPS started in AUTONOMOUS mode\n");
    
              // update variable
              gps_autonomous_needed = false;
            }
            else
            {
              printf("Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: %d\n", gps_status);
            }
          }
    
          delay(10000);
        }
        else
        {
          printf("no satellites fixed. Error: %d\n", error);
        }
      }
      else
      {
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
        // Restart GPS feature
        ////////////////////////////////////////////////
        printf("Restarting the GPS engine\n");
    
        // stop GPS
        _4G.gpsStop();
        delay(1000);
    
        // start GPS
        gps_status = _4G.gpsStart(arduPi4G::GPS_MS_BASED);
    
        // check answer
        if (gps_status == 0)
        {
          printf("GPS started in MS-BASED. Time(ms) = %d\n", millis() - previous);
        }
        else
        {
          printf("Error calling the 'gpsStart' function. Code: %d\n", gps_status);
        }
      }
    }
    
    
    //////////////////////////////////////////////
    // Main loop setup() and loop() declarations
    //////////////////////////////////////////////
    int main()
    {
        setup();
        while(1) loop();
        return (0);
    }
    //////////////////////////////////////////////
    
            

    In this example, the GPS is started in MS-Based mode. Once location is acquired, the GPS is stopped and started again in Standalone mode. In the following figures, it is possible to see how the GPS module gets its first position 41 seconds after switching on the 4G module. The green icon is the true device position. The red icon is the position the 4G module returns along different iterations. Finally, we can see how the module achieves a great location detection after 73 seconds.

    First iteration (41 seconds after starting the 4G module). Distance error: 42 meters.


    Second iteration (53 seconds after starting the 4G module). Distance error: 28 meters.


    Third iteration (63 seconds after starting the 4G module). Distance error: 28 meters.


    Fourth iteration (73 seconds after starting the 4G module). Distance error: 7 meters.


    The location given by the A-GPS module may vary depending on the spot used to perform the test. The accuracy will improve when the device under test has better GPS satellites coverage. In conclusion, the detection accuracy may vary from 10 to 100 meters if the device has no good satellites coverage. Or worse in the case no satellites can be found.

    NOTE: GPS is only available for LE910-EUG, LE910-NAG and LE910-SKG modules not for LE910-AU V2, LE910-JB V2 and LE910-JK V2 modules.

    For more info visit the tutorial: 4G + GPS Shield for Arduino and Raspberry Pi Tutorial (LTE / WCDMA / HSPA+ / 3G / GPRS).

  • Choosing the right cellular module for Arduino and Raspberry Pi: 4G / 3G / GPRS / GSMJune 15, 2016

    Choosing the right cellular module for Arduino and Raspberry Pi: 4G / 3G / GPRS / GSM

    The new 4G shield for Arduino and Raspberry Pi enables the connectivity to high speed LTE, HSPA+, WCDMA cellular networks in order to make possible the creation of the next level of worldwide interactivity projects inside the new "Internet of Things" era.

    Most of the major cities are already turning their cellular networks to the new 4G LTE and at the same time shutting down the old technologies such as GPRS and GSM. 3G will survive a couple of years more but it is planned to be completely shut off too. For this reason from Cooking Hacks have decided to be the first to offer to the Maker community the possibility of using the amazing 4G cellular networks.

    Take a look at cellular modules for Arduino and Raspberry Pi you can find in Cooking Hacks store.

    Model
    Protocols
    Frequency Bands
    Certifications
    Market
    SIM908 GPRS / GSM 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz CE Europe
    SIM5215-E 3G / GPRS / GSM 850, 900, 1800, 2100MHz CE, GCF Europe
    SIM5215-A 3G / GPRS / GSM 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz FCC, IC, PTCRB US / Canada
    LE910-EU 4G / 3G / GPRS / GSM / WCDMA / HSPA+ / LTE 850, 900, 1800, 2100, 2600MHz CE, GCF, ANATEL Europe / Brasil
    LE910-NAG 4G / 3G / GPRS / GSM / WCDMA / HSPA+ / LTE 700, 850, 900, 1700, 1900MHz FCC, IC, PTCRB, AT&T Compliant US / Canada
    LE910-SKG 4G / LTE / HSPA+ 850, 1800MHz KCC South Korea
    LE910-AU V2 4G / LTE / HSPA+ 850, 1500, 2100MHz RCM Australia
    LE910-JN V2 4G / LTE / HSPA+ 850, 1500, 2100MHz NTT DoCoMo Japan
    LE910-JK V2 4G / LTE / HSPA+ 850, 1500, 2100MHz KDDi Japan
    Model
    GPS
    Camera Option
    SD Card
    USB Connnectivity
    SIM908
    Yes
    No
    No
    No
    SIM5215-E
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    SIM5215-A
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-EU
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-NAG
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-SKG
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-AU V2
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-JN V2
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    LE910-JK V2
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    Model
    Download Max Speed
    Upload Max Speed
    Antenna Diversity
    Cellular Carriers
    SIM908
    80kbps
    20kbps
    No
    Any
    SIM5215-E
    384Kbps
    384Kbps
    No
    Any
    SIM5215-A
    384Kbps
    384Kbps
    No
    Any
    LE910-EU
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any
    LE910-NAG
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any + Specially tested with AT&T
    LE910-SKG
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any + Specially tested with SK Telecom
    LE910-AU V2
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any + Specially tested with Telstra
    LE910-JN V2
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any + Specially tested with NTT DoCoMo
    LE910-JK V2
    100Mbps
    50Mbps
    Yes
    Any + Specially tested with KDDi

    Buy now



  • Equip your Lab for summer school with Cooking HacksMay 30, 2016

    education_post

    The end-of-class is here. Prepare the summer school equipping your lab with new kits. Summer time is perfect to improve students electronic skills with our specially designed kits for education. Take advantage of this long period of time and encourage them to be the best prepared to start next school year.

    One year ago, Cooking Hacks presented a website redesign to give greater importance to technical education and teaching. For that reason, we have been including kits focused on education and nowadays you can find more than 50 kits.

    More than 50 Education Kits available

    All of our kits are available with the most well-known communication protocols as 3G/GPRS, WiFi, LoRa, LoRaWAN, SIGFOX, ZigBee, etc. Besides, they enable a total customization because they are available with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel Galileo and Libelium Waspmote Sensor Platform boards. Just select the platform that best suits your needs and start developing amazing IoT projects.

    Waspmote Starter Kit

    Waspmote Starter Kit
    Buy now

    Waspmote Evaluator Kit

    Waspmote Evaluator Kit
    Buy now

    Starter Kit

    Starter Kit
    Buy now

    New Education Kits category

    Up to now, you could find our wide range of kits in some categories sort by platforms, user level, skills and applications. There you were able to find kits designed towards education mixed with others.

    Now we have decided to release an Education kits category on purpose. This decision was made to emphasize this focus towards teaching. From now you will find the 'Education' category inside 'Kits by categories' in the left menu. As new Education kits will be launching we will add them to this category.

    The products contained in this category are specially designed for students and educational entities. To ease their purchase, the prices are adjusted to the maximum, being possible to find products with a 30% discount over its real price. These price conditions follow the line of the education orientation of Cooking Hacks.

    education_category_menu

    Documentation and training

    In addition, as you know, there are over 100 step-by-step tutorials available in order to help you to develop your IoT projects in a clever, pleasant and visual way. Following with the tutorials, we suggest you to visit the Cooking Hacks YouTube channel. Both tutorials and videos are made by our engineer team, who are also in charge of the Cooking Hacks Forum, the place where you will find answers to all your doubts.

    Finally, working by the hand of Libelium, we organize two types of training in Waspmote: a quarterly Waspmote Face-to-Face Workshop and a monthly Waspmote Free Overview Webinar (with the exception of January, July and August). They are the best option to get an overview of our Waspmote Sensor Platform to get started with it.

    To give a greater importance to technical education and teaching is a priority aim of Cooking Hacks and, for that, we want to encourage all the students and help all the educational entities to develop their projects. In the near future, companies will look for more than 4 million developers and we want to participate in their training.

  • LoRaWAN 900 / 915MHz America Module now available at Cooking Hacks!May 4, 2016

    LoRaWAN 900 / 915MHz America Module now available at Cooking Hacks!

    Are you interested in developing projects with LoRaWAN technology in U.S.? You are in luck because the announcement you were waiting has come. The LoRaWAN 900 / 915 MHz modules for Arduino, Raspberry Pi 3 and Waspmote has been released in our store, so now you can create your own Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) deployments.

    Remember that LoRaWAN is a private and spread-spectrum modulation technique which allows sending data at extremely low data-rates to extremely long ranges and enables long distance communication points to more than 22 km (13.6 miles) away. It works even through buildings, what makes it one of the best options for developing projects in an urban environment.

    Discover all the features and the possibilities of our LoRaWAN 900 / 915 MHz with our products:

    For more information about LoRaWAN 900 / 915MHz visit the LoRaWAN Technology for Arduino, Waspmote and Raspberry Pi tutorial.

  • Cooking Hacks launches the IoT Starter Kits fully integrated with our Waspmote Sensor KitsMarch 8, 2016

    iot_kits_post

    Cooking Hacks has launched the IoT Starter Kits, a fully configurable range of kits. This is a great way to begin in the IoT world using one of the most professional solutions.

    These kits are based on the successful open source Waspmote Sensor Platform, designed by Libelium, and on one of the most well-known communication protocols. In this sense, you can find solutions available with SigFox, LoRaWAN, LoRa, WiFi, 3G, Zigbee and GPRS+GPS. The distinctive feature of these IoT Starter Kits is that they are fully configurable with our Waspmote Sensor Kits, which are ideal to monitor different parameters related to Smart Cities, gases, agriculture, etc. Besides, they include rechargeable batteries in order to have an autonomous functioning.

    In this category, you will find the following IoT Starter Kits Kits:

    Do not miss the chance to get involved in the IoT World with our IoT Starter Kits and develop monitoring solutions that will add value to your projects making them more complete and professional.

  • Introducing some New KitsJuly 28, 2015

    As you probably know by now, we released a new version of our website a few weeks ago. Apart from the visual aspect (we hope you're enjoying it), we have seized the opportunity to focus on technical education. Read about it here.

    This means a lot of new kits and tutorials for Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Waspmote and Intel Galileo. Now we would like to tell you a little bit more in detail about our new kits.

    Our best shields and modules for Arduino, Raspberry Pi and Galileo have now their own kit. For instance, there's a Bluetooth Kit for the Bluetooth module Pro, a Tracking Kit for the GPRS+GPS Quadband Module or the Extreme Range Connectivity Kit for the LoRa module (868MHz/900MHz).

    3G+GPS Mobile Kit

    HVAC & TV Infrared Control Kit

    3G+GPS Mobile Kit (left) & HVAC & TV Infrared Control Kit (right)

    We have completely rearranged our idea of kits and included everything you need in a kit to develop full applications. Apart from the shield itself and some components, every kit contains a few accessories to be used with the shield: as you can see in the image above, the 3G+GPS Mobile Kit comes with GPS and 4G antennas, a thin speaker, an internal speaker, a microphone and a 2MP videocamera.

    In addition to all these new kits we have classified them by Platform, User Level and Category, so you can quickly find the right kit according to your experience, and depending on the field you want to work in.

    Customize Your Kit: Choose Your Platform

    Apart from having put together all these new kits, we also give you the chance to choose the platform you want to work with: Arduino, Raspberry Pi or Intel Galileo. Obviously, if you already have any of these boards and you just want to buy a kit with no platform it's fine.

    As you can see, we tried to supply in this platforms everything you need to program and power these boards, so you can start working right away without having to buy additional items.

    Arduino Platform

    Raspberry Pi Platform

    Arduino (left) & Raspberry Pi (right) Platforms. Include one of them in your Kit

    Starter Kit

    The Starter Kit has been upgraded and now has a few more components than it used to. Apart from a bunch of resistors and jumper cables, you can find some other basic components like push buttons (4x), potentiometers (2x),a piezo speaker or a breadboard.

    There's also some LEDs (red, green and RGB), sensors (LDR and Temperature), a transistor and a 9V to barrel jack adapter.

    New Starter Kit

    Additionally, we have included a Micro Servo, a Hobby Motor and an LCD screen. These items open a whole new world of applications for your projects: the LCD will allow you to visualize any data from the sensors, and the Motor and Micro Servo, along with the accessories, will provide you with tools for controlling any moving part of your project.

    You can buy this kit separately, but we thought it would be a good idea to have all the items of the Starter Kit in the rest of the kits. This way, if you buy any of them, like the Smart Cards Kit (NFC/RFID 13.56MHz), you will find everything from the Starter Kit in it, so you can make a specific application but with all these common and useful items.

    If you want to check everything you can accomplish with these new kits take a look at the tutorials we have prepared.

    Learning Kit

    The Learning kit is the first step for beginners in the Arduino world. Just like the rest of the kits you can buy it with or without the Arduino platform.

    Similar to the Starter Kit, it contains fairly common components like resistors, LEDs, an LCD display or some push buttons. The difference is that the shield comes unassembled, so you have to place and solder every component yourself (you will need extra tools).

    Learning Kit

    The idea is that you can learn step by step the basics of the through-hole soldering, and once the kit is assembled, you can program several applications to get started with Arduino, like controlling the LEDs with the buttons, displaying the temperature in the LCD or making a real life alarm clock.

    You can follow this detailed tutorial where we tell you how to prepare and solder the shield, download the libraries and complete every example.

    Robot Kit

    This one is also a brand new kit, and, as the Learning Kit, it is supposed to help you improve your soldering and programming skills. The Robot Kit contains everything you need to assemble your own tracked robot, small enough to qualify for Mini Sumo. It has two micro gear motors and a pair of silicone tracks. For detecting impacts and tracking orientation it has a 3-axis accelerometer, and an array of six infrared reflectance sensors enables line following and edge detection.

    Robot Kit

    The Robot is powered by 4 AA batteries and controlled with an Arduino Uno and a motor driver Zumo shield. This kit has its own tutorial where we explain what you need and how to solder and configure the robot. You can find libraries that will make it a little bit easier to control the robot and a few examples to get started, like a border detector, RC robot or a line follower.

    And there's more to come!

    We hope you like our new or upgraded Kits, and find them useful. Stay tuned to know more about our new kits: more to come in this blog. In the meantime, you can check a complete list of all our Kits here.

  • Send data at extreme long range using LoRa with Arduino, Raspberry Pi and Intel GalileoDecember 1, 2014

    What is LoRa?

    LoRa is a new, private and spread-spectrum modulation technique which allows sending data to extremely long ranges.

    You can use LoRa right now with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Intel Galileo. We have made libraries and examples for all of them.

    The SX1272 LoRa module can be connected along with the Multiprotocol Radio Shield to your Arduino or Intel Galileo, enabling transmissions with another SX1272 LoRa module. This wireless communication module is also compatible with Raspberry Pi through the connection bridge.

    RaspberryPi Arduino Multiprotocol SX1272

    The LoRa module works in both 868 and 900 MHz ISM bands, which makes it suitable for virtually any country. Those frequency bands are lower than the popular 2.4 GHz band, so path loss attenuation is better in LoRa. In addition, 868 and 900 MHz are bands with much fewer interference than the highly populated 2.4 GHz band. Besides, these low frequencies provide great penetration in possible materials (brick walls, trees, concrete), so these bands get less loss in the presence of obstacles than higher bands.

    The great performance of LoRa in terms of sensitivity, path loss and obstacle penetration, makes LoRa a disruptive technology enabling really long range links. This is specially important in urban scenarios, with very difficult transmission conditions. To sum up, LoRa can get long ranges in city deployments, so it reduces dramatically the size of the backbone network (repeaters, gateways or concentrators).

    Transmit data at distances of several miles

    Now you can transmit data at distances of several miles, even through buildings in urban environments, and over 20 miles in open spaces.

    LoRa at a glance

    sx1272 Module
    LoRa Key Features
    Module SX1272
    Dual Frequency Band 863-870 MHz (Europe)
    902-928 MHz (US)
    Transmission Power 25 mW
    Sensitivity -134 dBm
    Channels 8 (868MHz)
    13 (915MHz)
    Range LOS = 21km (13.4miles)
    NLOS = +2km (1.2miles)

    The tests

    We have performed long range tests, getting the awesome distance of 22 km (13.6 miles) in LOS configurations and +2km (1.2 miles) in urban scenarios (going through buildings). The margin in those conditions would allow even more distance (x2, x3), the only problem was to keep the line-of-sight condition.

    Modules and Documentation

    Check the complete list of kits and accessories of SX1272 LoRa module for Arduino, Raspberry Pi and Intel Galileo.

    You can also see here all the LoRa modules for Waspmote.

    Check all the LoRa's key features in this step-by-step tutorial.

  • We launch Open Aquarium! - Fish tank Monitoring and Aquaponics platform for ArduinoOctober 14, 2014

    We are very excited this week: we are pleased to present you Open Aquarium, our new sensor platform that automate control and maintenance tasks in aquariums through wireless connectivity and yes, it comes with an open source API.

    This new Makers solution is based on Arduino, and includes specialized sensors to measure vital parameters to aquatic life. Open Aquarium has been designed to help you to take care of your fish by automating the control and maintenance tasks that take place in fish tanks, ponds and aquaponic installations.

    Open Aquarium Project -  Aquariums Monitoring for Arduino

    Open Aquarium allows to remotely control your aquarium and include sensors to monitor factors in water such as temperature, pH, conductivity; it measures water levels and leakage, and deploys actuators that can feed the fish, regulate water heating / cooling, activate pumps to change water or administer medicine, and control light intensity to simulate day and night cycles. The sensors send information using wireless interfaces such as Wi-Fi, GPRS and 3G, for a perfect solution to monitor complex Aquaponic installations.

    Open Aquarium comes with a complete open source API and a web application that allows collected information to be stored in a database and visualized from a browser or from iPhone or Android smartphone devices.

    Designed specifically for Makers, our aim is to design connected technology using open source code to help makers discover, improve, and scale new sensor-based solutions for the Internet of Things.

    The Kits

    Open Aquarium consists of two different and complementary kits:

    and many several extra accessories.

    You can check all Open Aquarium kits and accesories here.

    Documentation and support

    You can check our complete tutorial here: Open Aquarium - Aquaponics and Fish Tank Monitoring for Arduino ā€“ Step by Step Guide. Remember you can also check our forum where you can get support for Open Aquarium.

    And do not forget to check also the Open Garden Platform!

    Open Garden allows you to remotely control your indoor, outdoor and hydroponics plants starting at just 199ā‚¬. Check the complete tutorial here.

  • More Open Garden real project photosAugust 21, 2014

    We are very happy to show you more pics of our Open Garden projects. As you may know, Open Garden is an Open Source hardware alternative to commercial home automation to remotely control your indoor, outdoor and hydroponic plants. We strongly believe it has huge potential due to its flexibility: its made of many separate sensors and actuators - it's a very modular and flexible environment.

    As you surely remember, you can find three different Open Garden kits: indoor, outdoor and hydroponics. These kits will help you to use the solution in greenhouses or houses, external gardens or fields, or even plants in water installations, respectively.

    In the photos you can see a three node Open Garden indoor installation:

    1.- One street monitoring node - no pics, it's allocated in the balcony - which monitors temperature, humidity and external light.

    2.- A second node controlling the soil moisture of a big plant in the dining room. If you look closely at the pictures, you could appreciate the sensor: is the black wire in the left side of the Gateway, it gets into the ground on the left of the plant.

    More Open Garden Pics in Flickr
    More Open Garden Pics in Flickr

    3.- A third node is also controlling the soil moisture of a third space, composed by a tomatoe plant, a mint plant and a basil one. This third node is also monitoring air temperature and humidity and ground temperature. You can notice the gateway by his side - it's connected to the water pump for drip irrigation. You can see the droppers in the last of the photos.

    More Open Garden Pics in Flickr
    More Open Garden Pics in Flickr

    Open Garden Droppers

    In this case, we are not using the Open Garden and XBee shields, or the Wifi module.

    Bonus tip: the gateway is connected to a RaspBerry Pi (USB Connection). We are stablishing an UART communication to save all the data in a database.

    We hope you have enjoyed the photos, and we encourage you to develop your own Open Garden projects following our step-by-step tutorial. We will be very happy to receive your project photos, and to share them in Twitter or Instagram, or RT your posts around Open Garden.

    You can also purchase the kits here:

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