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Airflow Sensor (Breathing) for e-Health Platform [Biometric / Medical Applications]

80 €80.00

Availability: Retired

The Airflow Sensor allows to monitor the patient's breathing (airflow rate).

You can use it with the e-Health Sensor Shield or buy the e-Health Sensor Platform Complete Kit.

Description

The nasal airflow sensor is a device used to monitor airflow rate of a patient in need of respiratory help. This device consists of a flexible thread which fits behind the ears, and a set of two prongs which are placed in the nostrils. Breathing is measured by these prongs.

You can find our e-Health Sensor Platform Complete Kit to get a complete First Aid Kit for Makers or buy the e-Health Sensor Shield separately.

IMPORTANT: The e-Health Sensor Platform has been designed by Cooking Hacks in order to help researchers, developers and artists to measure biometric sensor data for experimentation, fun and test purposes. However, as the platform does not have medical certifications it can not be used to monitor critical patients who need accurate medical monitoring or those whose conditions must be accurately measured for an ulterior professional diagnosis.

NOTE: If you are searching for Wireless Sensor Networks devices (motes) you may be interested in our ready to market sensor platform: Waspmote which counts with more than 50 sensors available to use.

Related Tutorials

The e-Health Sensor Shield V2.0 allows Arduino and Raspberry Pi users to perform biometric and medical applications where body monitoring is needed by using 10 different sensors: pulse, oxygen in blood (SPO2), airflow (breathing), body temperature, electrocardiogram (ECG), glucometer, galvanic skin response (GSR - sweating), blood pressure (sphygmomanometer), patient position (accelerometer) and muscle/eletromyography sensor (EMG).

The idea behind the Raspberry Pi to Arduino shields connection bridge is to allow to use any of the shields, boards and modules designed for Arduino in Raspberry Pi.

It includes also the possibility of connecting digital and analog sensors, using the same pinout of Arduino but with the power and capabilities of Raspberry.

The current tutorial explains how to take the most of the Galileo board by using on it the Arduino and Raspberry Pi shields and modules designed by Cooking Hacks

Galileo comes with a single-core 32-bit, 400MHz Quark SoC X1000 processor, supports 3.3 or 5 volt shields and has an Ethernet and USB port. Compatible with Windows, Mac OS and Linux, the software of Galileo also has support for the Arduino shield ecosystem.

If you are interested in Internet of Things (IoT) or M2M projects check our open source sensor platform Waspmote which counts with more than 100 sensors available to use 'off the shelf', a complete API with hundreds of ready to use codes and a low consumption mode of just 0.7µA to ensure years of battery life.

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